What a World! What a World! – Week 7

It was just a week ago I was wondering outblog (or would it be blog-dering?) if there was – well, not if there was more, but what was out there beyond LibriVox for Voice over Work. I am having what I feel is a modicum of success on LibriVox. Moderators have asked me to pick up a few small projects here and there, which is a nice little boost to the self-image. And my recordings are sounding better to me as I get my breathing, pacing, and technique into some kind of workable order.

These are some of the things I found, either through my following rabbit trails or in other blogs and/or podcasts:

  • ACX
      • Run by Amazon, and linked to Audible, it is the Audiobook Creation eXchange, where authors and narrators collaborate to get audiobooks created and sold on Audible, Amazon, and iTunes.
      • There is no cost or membership hoops through which it is necessary to jump.
      • Depending on the type of job you choose, payment might be directly from the Rights Holder, or from ACX.
  • VoiceBunny
      • A marketplace to connect voice talent of all ilks with people needing their services. Includes a wide variety of talents, including commercials, radio and TV spots, eLearning, narration, and a lot more.
      • An audition is required to gain membership to this site, and for members they match your profile with job requests. When a match is made, you can audition if the job interests you.
      • There doesn’t appear to be any cost.
      • I believe VoiceBunny does the bookkeeping, so you don’t have to rely on customers to pay you outside the service.
  • Voice.com (it’s odd to me that all these sites are referenced by a one work title, except for this one, which is always called Voice.com, not just Voice)
      • One of several Pay to Play sites, and seems to be regarded as the leader of the pack in terms of volume of work and talent.
      • There is a premium of up to $400 for a year’s subscription.
      • Provides audition opportunities matched to your profile.
  • Voice123
      • See Voice.com. Okay, that’s a cop-out, but they are very similar it seems to me.
      • Some podcasts indicate that the volume of auditions on Voice123 is not as good in quality or quantity as Voice.com, but that is hearsay.
      • Again, about $400 for a year, but might be found for less at times.
  • Fiverr
      • A free to join site, connecting contractors to clients for a huge variety of services, such as web design, writing, editing, music production, technical services, and Voice over Work for people like us.
      • It seems to work like classified ads, if you ever heard of those. In the old days, things called newspapers had sections where you could solicit yourself for work and clients would call you up and pay you for whatever it is you would do.
      • Hey, just because I used the word “solicit” doesn’t mean it’s dirty.
      • The name, interestingly, is reported to come from the original idea of the site that you could get any job done starting for $5.
      • Come on, people. Really? Get your mind out of the gutter.
  • Upwork
      • Free to join, with a nice little app as well.
      • The opposite of Fiverr, as far as the clients advertise and the talent auditions.
      • Auditioning is called “Make a Proposal,” and you have a number of “contacts” per month to use. To submit a proposal uses 2-5 contacts, so unlike the other sites, there isn’t unlimited auditioning/proposing for jobs.
      • For a fee, you can get some extra services and extra contacts with rollover capability.
  • FindAWay Voices
      • Free to join site, and it seems a bit like a secret club to figure out what is going on.
      • Working mostly with audiobooks, you submit a resume and up to 10 samples of your work and then wait.
      • If the stars align, you will be contacted – behind the curtain, the staff is matching their clients to their talent, the clients listen to the samples and check out the resume, and contact is made if the client wants to have an audition of make an offer.

This information is based almost exclusively on what I could learn by peeking through the fences, reading blogs, listening to podcasts, and registering, but I have no first hand knowledge (yet) of the audition process of any of these. I would be interested in hearing more information from any of you that have used these or other sites.

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